Essex Piano Gallery

French Polishing

Re-Conditioning

Re-Stringing

Player Pianos (pianolas)

Piano Tuning

Completed Work

For Sale

 

Search this site:

    

French Polishing

 

Essex Piano Gallery's highly skilled French Polisher has many years experience in the traditional method of French Polishing.

 
The term French Polishing is frequently used to cover all methods of wood finishing. There is only one method and only one material used in French Polishing. The following explanation should ease any difficulty to decifier between French Polishing and modern wood finishing.

The term French Polishing comes from the two French brothers who invented the method of transferring Shellac onto wood back in the 17th Century.

The material used in French Polishing is called Shellac, whereas a modern finish would use a lacquer. Shellac derives from the Laccifer Lacca beetle from Asia. It comes in different forms, which include Button Polish, Special Pale Polish, Transparent Polish  to name but a few. This is applied by hand using a Rubber. This is the only way a true French Polisher will apply this. No spray guns are used. The Shellac is built up over a period of time until a Mirror Finish is achieved. Traditionally, this is called a Piano Finish.

When a piano has been stripped of its old finish, we can offer our clients the option to choose the final colour of their piano.

For any further information, please click here to contact us, or Tel: 01702 612260

Below are some examples of French Polishing. These pianos have been traditionally French Polished  by our French Polisher, to a Mirror Finish:

 

Before

After

 

Upright Piano

 

Grand Piano

 

Pianola (Player Piano)

Pianola

Upright Piano

 

Grand Piano

 

Pianola (Player Piano)

   

Before


 
After